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7 Comments

  1. I’m so glad you have given great instructions for making and using aquafaba–nice job!
    However, your statement, “In the last few years, a new discovery has been made—and I don’t think I’m overstating when I say it has revolutionized vegan cooking!” made me chuckle.
    In 1970, I became vegan, and one of the first things I learned from the vegan subculture was how to use the liquid from cooking my own beans to make a substitute for egg whites. We used it in just about everything we’d normally use eggs for: cakes, mousses, custards, meringues, and savory foods. So the knowledge of “aquafaba” and all its great uses has been around for at least 50 years, and probably many more years than that!

  2. I’m so excited to have found your website! You seem to have the answer to all my questions ;). I haven’t yet tried any of your aquafaba tricks but have just finished making the vegan chocolate ganache and I had to restrain myself not to eat it up right out of the pot… it’s absolutely marvelous. I just signed up for your newsletter, can’t wait.
    Thanks!
    helen

  3. This is great info. Thanks so much. I always add a bit of oil when pressure cooking my beans, and now I know why I’ve had so many meringue failures! I had given up, but next time I’ll omit the oil and try again. 🙂